Long-lost L.M. Montgomery postcards discovered, donated back to P.E.I.

– Even though she knew what they were, Epperly said turning over the postcards and seeing Montgomery’s handwriting was “this shock … it’s her handwriting. Because she has very distinctive, and sometimes very difficult, handwriting, and to see that and to see the ink changing where she dipped the pen to write, it’s like treasure to find this.”-

Click here to read the full CBC story.

Then and now: really — half a century?!

Picturing the bo(a)orders: graduating, in 1969, after three years at St. Catherine’s School for Girls in Richmond, Virginia, and composing a life between the lines.

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In the summer of 1968, my mother and I made a pilgrimage to Prince Edward Island, Canada, the setting and inspiration for L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables.  PEI felt like home; I vowed to return.  Secretly that fall, I applied to only one college: Prince of Wales College, L.M. Montgomery’s alma mater, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.  After our June 1969 graduation and much too late to apply anywhere else, I received a letter telling me PWC no longer existed but I could come to the newly amalgamated University of Prince Edward Island if I wished.  Yikes! But of course I went and was so early that I was the very first student to register at the new school. 

Except for the time I spent in England doing a Ph.D., I stayed in Canada and  became a Canadian citizen; taught English literature for thirty years in two universities; founded a research institute in 1993 devoted to the study and informed celebration of Montgomery’s life, works, culture, and influence (www.lmmontgomery.ca); wrote books and articles on Anthony Trollope and on Montgomery; and eventually served as the first woman president of the University of Prince Edward Island (www.elizabethepperly.com).  I became Professor Emerita of English in 2007 and received an honorary doctorate ten years later.  That is the black-and-white snapshot.  The colour version has warmth and a laugh track.

When I graduated from St. C., I thought I would be a writer of fiction and a geologist.  I imagined I would live again in Virginia. I assumed I would probably get married and have children of my own.  I am so glad life has surprised me again and again!  I still love fiction and rocks, and my partner (of almost 30 thirty years) and my step children and step grandchildren remind me every day that Wordsworth was right: we do half create what we perceive. The other half is a gift.

– Betsy